old bathroom faucets

old bathroom faucets 1

Tools & Materials Tools Basin Wrench Adjustable Wrenches Bucket Putty Knife Rags Materials Bathroom Faucet Kitchen Faucet Supply Lines Silicone Caulk Product costs, availability and item numbers may vary online or by market. Missing anything? Shop Online Buying a Faucet When buying a faucet you need to make sure it will fit your sink. Your sink will have one, two, or three holes for the faucet. Plus, the holes will be either centerset or widespread. Make sure you have this information when you’re shopping. When in doubt, take the old one to the store with you. Remove the Old Faucet Instructions Step 1 Turn off the water supply. The valves are typically under the sink. If not, turn off the water at the main valve. Then turn on the faucet to relieve any water pressure left in the lines. Step 2 Disconnect the supply lines from the faucet. Use a basin wrench if you can’t reach the connections with your hands. Step 3 Disconnect the lift rod, and then remove the nuts from under the faucet. Remove the Drain Step 1 Unscrew the slip nut on the P-trap. Put a bucket underneath to catch water in the trap. Step 2 Disconnect the drain flange from the tailpiece. It should unscrew. Step 3 Clean around the old drain and faucet holes. Mineral spirits can help remove old silicone sealant. Install the New Faucet Step 1 Follow the manufacturer’s directions for specific installation instructions. Most installations begin with installing the gasket on the bottom of the faucet. Some require sealant or plumber’s putty. Then put the faucet through the mounting holes in the sink and tighten the mounting nuts. Step 2 Not all faucets come preassembled so you might have to attach the handles. It’s easy. Slip the guide ring onto the bottom of the handle, position it on the faucet base, and secure with the setscrew. A setscrew is the tiny screw on the underside of the handle. Your faucet probably came with a hex wrench to tighten it. Step 3 Next move on to the drain. Screw the nut all the way down on the drain body and push the gasket over it. Some gaskets are threaded and simply screw into place. Step 4 Apply just a little bit of silicone (some manufacturers recommend plumber’s putty) under the flange. Position the drain body on the bottom of the sink — making sure the pivot hole is facing the back — and screw the flange on from the top side. Step 5 Underneath, tighten the nut and gasket. On the top, use mineral spirits to clean up any excess silicone. Step 6 Install the drain rod next. Unscrew the pivot nut on the drain body, insert the horizontal rod through the hole in the stopper, and replace the nut. Push the horizontal rod down and secure the lift rod to the strap with the screw. Test the lift rod. Step 7 Reconnect the supply lines to the faucet. If your sink is already in place, use a basin wrench to reach the faucet shanks. Step 8 Flush the faucet by removing the aerator. This gets rid of debris or sediment in the faucet. Some faucets include a handy little tool to unscrew the aerator. When you’re done, keep it inside your vanity or with the rest of your tools. Turn on the hot and cold water for about a minute. Check all the connections for leaks and retighten if necessary. Screw the aerator back on and you’re done.
old bathroom faucets 1

4 × PICK BATH and shower faucets by what’s inside as well as outside. The Delta Monitor 1700 (about $172) features a pressure-balance valve that protects against shower shock by keeping water-temperature fluctuations within 3°F. It’s available in chrome and polished brass. WHERE TO SHOP Bath faucets are sold at hardware stores, lumberyards, home centers and bath-remodeling showrooms. Plumbing wholesalers are another source to consider. “A reputable plumbing wholesaler can give you accurate information about the product you won’t find on the packaging,” says Jean Butler, showroom manager for APEX Supply Co., a wholesaler in Richardson, Texas. For example, wholesalers can tell you whether a fitting is brass or brass-plated. They know the manufacturers and how well they stand behind their products. They also know what local contractors are buying – a good indication of what works for local codes and water conditions. Best of all, a wholesaler can often give you the best price. A safe course no matter where you buy is to stick with name-brand products known for quality and reliability. Off-brand faucets often are poorly made, and it’s difficult to get parts for them. Along with wholesalers, talk with plumbers, contractors and other pros who install bathroom fittings every day.
old bathroom faucets 2

PICK BATH and shower faucets by what’s inside as well as outside. The Delta Monitor 1700 (about $172) features a pressure-balance valve that protects against shower shock by keeping water-temperature fluctuations within 3°F. It’s available in chrome and polished brass. WHERE TO SHOP Bath faucets are sold at hardware stores, lumberyards, home centers and bath-remodeling showrooms. Plumbing wholesalers are another source to consider. “A reputable plumbing wholesaler can give you accurate information about the product you won’t find on the packaging,” says Jean Butler, showroom manager for APEX Supply Co., a wholesaler in Richardson, Texas. For example, wholesalers can tell you whether a fitting is brass or brass-plated. They know the manufacturers and how well they stand behind their products. They also know what local contractors are buying – a good indication of what works for local codes and water conditions. Best of all, a wholesaler can often give you the best price. A safe course no matter where you buy is to stick with name-brand products known for quality and reliability. Off-brand faucets often are poorly made, and it’s difficult to get parts for them. Along with wholesalers, talk with plumbers, contractors and other pros who install bathroom fittings every day.
old bathroom faucets 3

Step One // How to Replace a Bathroom Faucet Bath Faucet Overview Illustration by Gregory Nemec Before you can install a bathroom faucet, you need to know what type to buy. The majority of faucets for bath sinks have three parts: a center spout and two valves (on which the handles fit). Water passes through separate hot and cold supply lines controlled by the valves, then mixes in a tee and comes out the spout. Most standard sinks have three holes to accommodate these parts. However, the distance between the holes determines what type of faucet you can fit onto the sink.   After you remove the old faucet, measure from center to center on the two outer holes. If that distance is 6 inches or more, you will be able to install a wide-spread faucet (like the one in this project), which requires manually connecting the two valves to the mixing tee. But if there are only 4 inches between the holes, you need to get a center-spread or a mini-wide-spread faucet, a single unit encompassing the valves, the spout, and the connection between. A center-spread faucet has an escutcheon plate linking the pieces on top of the sink, while a mini-wide-spread looks like three independent pieces when viewed from above.   Faucets usually come from the manufacturer with everything except the lines to connect the water supplies to the valves (some handles are sold separately). For these you can use braided lines, which are very easy to install but should only be used where hidden; or rigid lines, which work better when the area under the sink is exposed.   Putting the faucet on is just a matter of piecing everything together in the right order. But TOH plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey says that novices can get tripped up in making connections, either by overtightening fittings (which can crack the sink or cause leaks) or by not holding lines steady as they turn the wrench. “If you’re not careful, you can twist the line and impede water flow,” he says. You should also be careful not to twist yourself as you work beneath the sink.
old bathroom faucets 4

Before you can install a bathroom faucet, you need to know what type to buy. The majority of faucets for bath sinks have three parts: a center spout and two valves (on which the handles fit). Water passes through separate hot and cold supply lines controlled by the valves, then mixes in a tee and comes out the spout. Most standard sinks have three holes to accommodate these parts. However, the distance between the holes determines what type of faucet you can fit onto the sink.   After you remove the old faucet, measure from center to center on the two outer holes. If that distance is 6 inches or more, you will be able to install a wide-spread faucet (like the one in this project), which requires manually connecting the two valves to the mixing tee. But if there are only 4 inches between the holes, you need to get a center-spread or a mini-wide-spread faucet, a single unit encompassing the valves, the spout, and the connection between. A center-spread faucet has an escutcheon plate linking the pieces on top of the sink, while a mini-wide-spread looks like three independent pieces when viewed from above.   Faucets usually come from the manufacturer with everything except the lines to connect the water supplies to the valves (some handles are sold separately). For these you can use braided lines, which are very easy to install but should only be used where hidden; or rigid lines, which work better when the area under the sink is exposed.   Putting the faucet on is just a matter of piecing everything together in the right order. But TOH plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey says that novices can get tripped up in making connections, either by overtightening fittings (which can crack the sink or cause leaks) or by not holding lines steady as they turn the wrench. “If you’re not careful, you can twist the line and impede water flow,” he says. You should also be careful not to twist yourself as you work beneath the sink.

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